Nov 2015 Bearing Witness Retreat at Auschwitz/Birkenau

November 2 – 6, 2015

Early Bird Fees Until December 31, 2014

Fee: $ 1,600 (includes tax deducticle donation of $300 for Scholarship Fund)

Fee: $ 1,400 (no tax deducticle donation)

 Early Bird Enrollment is not Complete Until Full Payment and Registration Form are Submitted

Description

Bernie Glassman and the Zen Peacemakers are returning for the 20th year to the old site of the concentration camps of Auschwitz-Birkenau, in Oświęcim, Poland, for a Bearing Witness Retreat in November 2015. Bernie Glassman began the annual Bearing Witness Retreats in 1996, with help from Eve Marko and Andrzej Krajewski. They have taken place annually every year since then. Much has been written about these annual retreats; at least half a dozen films have been made about them in various languages. They are multi-faith and multinational in character, with a strong focus on the Zen Peacemakers’ Three Tenets: Not-Knowing, Bearing Witness, and Loving Action.

Most of each day is spent sitting by the train tracks at Birkenau, both in silence and in chanting the names of the dead. There is time to walk through the vast camps, do vigils inside women’s and children’s barracks, and memorial services. Participants meet daily in small Council groups designed to create a safe place for people to share their inner experiences. The whole group meets in the evenings to bear witness to oneness in diversity.

Although Auschwitz, the Place, is the main Teacher for this retreat, experienced Spirit Holders (Zen Masters Bernie Glassman and Genro Gauntt, Senseis Cornelius von Collande, Frank De Waele, Andrzej Krajewski, Barbara  Wegmüller, Roland  Wegmüller, and Fleet Maull, Father Manfred Deselaers, Rabbi Shir Yaacov Feit and Ginni Stern)  meet each day to reflect on the retreat flow, schedule, events and make appropriate modifications if necessary.

To help uphold the ZPO standard of ethical behavior at our Bearing Witness Retreats, the Spirit Holders also serve as an Ethics Committee, responsible for receiving and addressing complaints of unethical behavior at the Retreat by any Staff Member or Participant.

Registration, Payment and How to Get More Information

Early Bird Fees Until December 31, 2014

Fee: $ 1,600 (includes tax deducticle donation of $300 for Scholarship Fund)

Fee: $ 1,400 (no tax deducticle donation)

From January 1, 2015

Fee: $ 1,800 (includes tax deducticle donation of $300 for Scholarship Fund)

Fee: $ 1,600 (no tax deducticle donation)

Young Adults (ages 18-28): $1,300

Single Room Add-on: $800

Double Room Add-on (For Non-Couples): $350 per person

Couples are in Double Rooms Free of Charge

1-Day Workshop (Oct 31) at the Saski Hotel, Krakow, Poland, on Introduction to The Way of Council: $200
Workshop does not include room and board.

Sunday Tour of Old Jewish Quarter of Krakow: $50

Provide a Tax Deductible Donation for supporting this Auschwitz Bearing Witness Retreat.

Please specify in the comments block, of the donation form, that your donation is for the support of the Auschwitz Retreat.

 You can also give Laurie Smith, (413) 367-5278,  your credit card information, or send a check made payable to Zen Peacemakers, PO Box 460, Sunderland, MA 01375 attention 2015 Auschwitz Retreat. The fee includes all buses, food and accommodations at the Dialogue Center in Oświęcim (walking distance to both Auschwitz 1 and Birkenau). Travel to Krakow and your stay in Krakow are not included in the fee. Please fill out the Registration Form below: There are a small number of single rooms. There are also double, triple and dorms (6 people to a dorm.) When you fill out the Registration Form please help us with room assignments by filling in your gender. Priority is given to couples for the doubles. If you are attending the retreat as a couple, please list your roommate and select “yes” on the couple’s button in the Registration Form. If you have a desired roommate, please give us their name in the appropriate box. If you have special needs please list them in the comments box. For more information about registration and payments, please contact Laurie Smith by: email or by Phone: 1 (413) 367-5278. For more information about the retreat, please contact Ginni Stern by: email or by Phone: 1-802-734-6223 or by Skype: ginnistern

Why do I keep going back to Auschwitz Birkenau-Bernie

This year I’m returning again to Auschwitz-Birkenau. I go almost every year. People wonder why I go back there. They weren’t surprised the first time I traveled to Poland, in 1994, to visit the biggest of the death camps. I’ve been a Zen Buddhist priest and a teacher of Zen for many years, and I’m also a Jew from Brooklyn whose mother originally came from Poland. In November 2015, the Zen Peacemakers will be conducting its 21st global, multi-faith Bearing Witness retreat at Auschwitz, and I will be there once again. Strictly speaking, my presence isn’t necessary at the retreat. A number of leaders and teachers from different religious traditions will be there. So why do I return? Why does a Zen teacher go back to Auschwitz-Birkenau again and again? At the Zen Peacemakers, which my former wife, Sandra Jishu Holmes, and I co-founded, we practice three Core Tenets: Penetrating the unknown by letting go of our fixed ideas; bearing witness to joy and suffering; and loving actions. At Auschwitz it is not hard to let go of fixed ideas. The place itself, with its endless gray skies overlooking miles of barbed wire and crumbling extermination compounds, is so terrifying that no matter how much we prepare for the visit, no matter how much we’ve read about it or pondered, it overwhelms us. Even if, like me, you’ve seen the exhibits more than once and have even walked several times down the endless railroad tracks that once brought so many to their end, there’s one thing you can still count on: Your expectations, your preconceptions, your most basic belief systems concerning love and hate, good and evil, will be annihilated in the face of Auschwitz. In fact, after seeing the endless photographs of dying camp inmates and the high piles of their belongings pillaged by the Nazis, and after visiting Birkenau and viewing the remains of that meticulous technology developed for the purpose of mass extermination and genocide, we stop thinking altogether. As writers and philosophers have already said, there’s no language for Auschwitz. I can only add, there are no thoughts, either. We are in a place of unknowing. Much of Zen practice, including many teaching techniques used by Zen masters, is aimed at bringing the Zen practitioner to this same place of unknowing, of letting go of what he or she knows. After walking through Auschwitz and Birkenau, there is an end to thought. We are numbed. All we can do is see the endless train tracks on the snow, feel the icy cold of a Polish winter on our bare hands, smell the rotting wood in the few remaining barracks, and listen to the names of the dead. At Birkenau we don’t sit in silence, we chant names. First we sit in a large circle around the railroad tracks, at what was once the Selection Site, directly opposite the crematoriums. A shofar blows to start the meditation period, and then four different people, each sitting at a different point on the rim of the circle, begin to chant the names of those who’d died at Auschwitz. The names come from official lists compiled by the SS. They’re also provided to us by various retreat participants, obtained from memory, family and friends. All of us take turns chanting names. Elisa Sara Fein (10.3.1907-8.12.1943) Heinrich Israel Feiner (8.3.1878-2.1.1944) Markus Fejer (14.7.1925-19.6.1942) Rywa Sara Feld (5.12.1911-6.12.194)) We chant for ten minutes, and then the person sitting next to us begins. The lists include the victims’ dates of birth and death. That’s how we know that some were very old, and some were only infants. But we don’t chant the dates, only the names. Lilly Ernst (9.2.1939-17.1.1944) Hugo Fenyvesi (27.10.1875-5.5.1942) Sophie Ferko (15.3.1943-21.5.1944) We are a global group, so the names are chanted by American, Irish, Dutch, Italian, German, Swiss, Israeli, Polish, and French voices. The names themselves are also from a multitude of languages. Everyone gets their turn. Across the large circle we hear the names. Sometimes one resembles the name of a co-worker back home, or of a friend. Sometimes the chanter pauses. She’s come across a name that’s exactly like her own. For telling names is like telling stories. When we recite the name out loud, dead bones come to life, the bones of men, women, and children from all over Europe. They lived, some grew up, some married, some had children, and all died. Their names become our names, their stories, our stories. That is what happens when we bear witness. Peter Grosz, an American living in the Czech Republic who participated in a retreat, recently wrote us (many of the people who attend send us letters, articles, and journal entries describing their experiences). Discussing the meaning of bearing witness, he wrote the following: “You can have seen what you’ve seen and never be a witness. You can see the whole world and never have witnessed anything. Only when what you see becomes significant to someone — to yourself, for instance — do you become a witness.” How does something become significant? What is this process of witnessing, or bearing witness, that is more than just seeing? When we bear witness to a situation, we become each and every aspect of that situation. When we bear witness to Auschwitz, at that moment there is no separation between us and the people who died. There is also no separation between us and the people who killed. We ourselves, as individuals, with our identities and ego structure, disappear, and we become the terrified people getting off the trains, the indifferent or brutal guards, the snarling dogs, the doctor who points right or left, the smoke and ash belching from the chimneys. When we bear witness to Auschwitz, we are nothing but all the elements of Auschwitz. It is not an act of will, it is an act of letting go. What we let go of is the concept of the person we think we are. It’s why we start from unknowing. Only then can we become all the voices of the universe — those that suffer, those that inflict suffering, and those that stand idly by. For we are all these people. We are the universe. After five days of sitting at the Selection Site and chanting names, many could see themselves as those who had gone to the gas chambers, including those who had no direct family connection to Auschwitz. Mothers thought of themselves bringing their own children into the death chambers. Men saw their own bodies going up in smoke in the crematoria. It was harder to see oneself as a guard who’d herded people to their death. One of the retreat participants was a Vietnam veteran. He said that he could see himself as one of the guards on top of the guardposts, aiming his gun at the people below. But not many people could see themselves that way. The famous prayer about oneness, the Sh’ma Yisrael, begins with Listen: Listen, O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is One. Not only does oneness begin with listening, listening begins with oneness. And Zen Peacemaker Order’s Buddhist service begins similarly: Attention! Attention! Raising the Mind of Compassion, the Supreme Meal is offered to all the hungry spirits throughout space and time, filling the smallest particle to the largest space. Listen! Attention! Bear witness! It can’t happen if you want to stay away from pain and suffering. It probably won’t happen if, like most people, you go to Auschwitz, look over the exhibits, and return to the buses for a quick getaway. When you come to Auschwitz, stay a while, and begin to listen to all the voices of that terrible universe — the voices that are none other than you — then something happens. During a retreat, a man of Jewish descent living in Denmark stood up one evening and spoke about forgiving those who had perpetrated cruelties at Auschwitz. A short while later I stood up and suggested: “And then what? So you forgive, and then what? Is that the end of it? Or is there something else to be done?” If I really bear witness, if I become all the voices of Auschwitz, then it is myself that I am forgiving, no one else. If I see that at every moment a part of me is raping, while another is being raped. A part of me is destroying while another part is being destroyed. A part of me goes hungry while another eats to excess. A part of me is paralyzed and a part of me takes action. Then it makes no sense to stay in the place of blame and guilt, of anger and accusation. When I begin to see that all these parts are me, I can begin to take care of the situation. When we’re bearing witness to Auschwitz, we’re doing nothing other than bearing witness to aspects of ourselves. It’s no different when we bear witness to poverty, homelessness, hunger, and disease. We see how one part of us does something, and another part of us suffers. If we get stuck in anger and in guilt, then we’re paralyzed, we can’t act. Only when we see that all these demons are nothing other than us, we can actually take action. Then we can begin to take care of the other, who is none other than our self. In Buddhism we say that we are all constantly transmigrating from one realm to another at every minute. There is the hell realm and the realm of the gods. There is also a realm of hungry ghosts. One of our images for a hungry ghost is a painfully thin person with a tiny mouth, a long, narrow throat and an immense stomach. The hungry ghost is always hungry, but has only a tiny capacity to absorb the nourishment that he needs. I go back to Auschwitz again and again for this reason: Each time I return to that huge death camp I realize anew that I am full of hungry ghosts. I’m full of clinging, craving, unsatisfied spirits. Each part of me that is struggling, in pain, unsatisfied, angry, and unresolved, is a hungry ghost. A starving child, an abusive parent, a stricken mother leading her child into the death chamber, a brutal guard, a drug addict who kills to get his fix, they are all starving, struggling aspects of me. Me is everyone and everything, including those that look away. At the end of his long letter to me, Peter added: “Auschwitz is a Godless place only for those who see it as bereft of voice.” He stayed there for five days and found Auschwitz full of voices, all of them his own. Attention! Attention! Raising the Mind of Compassion, the Supreme Meal is offered to all the hungry spirits throughout space and time, filling the smallest particle to the largest space. All you hungry spirits in the Ten Directions, please gather here. Sharing your distress, I offer you this food, hoping it will resolve your thirsts and hungers.

Video

Schedule & Cancellation Policy

The 5-day retreat will begin on the morning of November 2 and end with a Sabbath dinner on November 6. Participants are asked to gather in Krakow by Sunday evening, November 1. The retreat will begin the following morning by bus to Oświęcim, 90 minutes away. We encourage participants to arrive in Krakow some days before to see the beautiful city and reduce effects of jet-lag. There are a small number of single rooms. There are also double, triple and dorms (6 people to a dorm.) When you fill out the Registration Form please help us with room assignments by filling in your gender. If you have a desired roommate, please give us their name in the appropriate box. If you have special needs please list them in the comments box.

The fee includes all buses, food and accommodations at the Dialogue Center in Oświęcim (walking distance to both Auschwitz 1 and Birkenau). Travel to Krakow and your stay in Krakow are not included in the fee.

For more information, please contact Laurie Smith by: email or by Phone: 1 (413) 367-5278.

Final Registration in Krakow

Final registration will take place in Krakow, in the Saski Hotel Lobby, Sunday night, November 1. You will receive your registration packets including lodging information, list of names to read at the Auschwitz site, name tags and general information.

We are reserving a block of rooms at a group discount rate for Sunday night. We recommend that you get reservations at this hotel (please click on the “Hotel” Tab below for directions on how to secure a reservation with our group discount.) The hotel cost for this night is not included in the Retreat Fee. You can see other lodging options by clicking on the “Hotel” Tab.

If the workshop is canceled by the Zen Peacemakers, registrants will receive full refunds of the paid registration fees. No refunds can be made for lodging, airfare or any other expenses related to attending the workshop.

If a registration is canceled by the participant more than one month (31 days) prior to the retreat start date, all but $100 of the paid fees will be refunded.

If you cancel 15-30 days before the start date of the workshop, you will receive all but $300 of your retreat fee.

Fees are non refundable if a registration is cancelled by the participant within two weeks (14 days) of the start date of the retreat.

All refunds will be processed within 60 days of notification of cancellation.

For more information, please contact Laurie Smith by: email or by Phone: 1 (413) 367-5278.

Young Adult Participation

We extend a special invitation to the 2015 Auschwitz Retreat for Young Adults, ages 18-28 at a reduced fee of $1300.

Young participants in the past have said that this retreat was crucial and formative, inspiring and guiding them in their decisions about life, work, and practice. Experienced retreat leaders will meet specifically with all Young Adults to provide extra support to them. Many participants raise money for this retreat by writing family members, friends, teachers, sangha members and work associates, requesting financial assistance to attend the Auschwitz Retreat. In return, they create a symbolic way of taking their donors with them to the retreat and undertake to share their stories and experiences with their donors when they return. We have encouraged begging as an important and inspiring practice (see Raising a Mala) for such a spiritual sojourn such as this. In addition, it might be possible for students to acquire university credit for their participation as a travel abroad course. f you want guidance for ways to raise funds for the retreat or to brainstorm ways to approach your university for credit, please contact Laurie Smith.

For more information, please contact Laurie Smith by: email or by Phone: 1 (413) 367-5278.

Workshops in The Way of Council

This 1-Day Workshop, before the retreat at the Saski Hotel, Krakow, Poland, (Saturday, October 31, 2015) is led by Jared Seide, the Director, Center for Council Practice. Introduction to the Way of Council. Workshop does not include room and board. Fee: $200

Refund Policy

If the workshop is canceled by the Zen Peacemakers, registrants will receive full refunds of the paid registration fees. No refunds can be made for lodging, airfare or any other expenses related to attending the workshop.

If a registration is canceled by the participant more than one month (31 days) prior to the workshop start date, all but $25 of the paid fees will be refunded.

If you cancel 15-30 days before the start date of the workshop, you will receive all but $50 of your workshop fee.

Fees are non refundable if a registration is cancelled by the participant within two weeks (14 days) of the start date of the workshop.

All refunds will be processed within 30 days of notification of cancellation.

Sunday Tour of Old Jewish Quarter of Krakow

Fee: $50

Oskar Schindler Factory

We found it was too much to include a tour of Schindler’s Factory with this tour, so if you have an extra day, we encourage you to spend time there as well. Saturday, November 7, 2015 would be the perfect day for this tour. If you arrive in Krakow on Friday, October 30, 2015, some of us will attend the Krakow Jewish Community Center for a reformed Shabbat Celebration with Rabbi Tanya Segal, the 1st woman rabbi in Poland http://www.usatoday.com/news/religion/2008-02-14-poland-female-rabbi_N.htm It is very interesting to witness and participate in this emerging Jewish Community in Krakow.

Refund Policy

If the tour is canceled by the Zen Peacemakers, registrants will receive full refunds of the paid registration fees. No refunds can be made for lodging, airfare or any other expenses related to attending the workshop.

If a registration is canceled by the participant more than one month (31 days) prior to the tour start date, all but $5 of the paid fees will be refunded.

If you cancel 15-30 days before the start date of the tour, you will receive all but $10 of your tour fee.

Fees are non refundable if a registration is cancelled by the participant within two weeks (14 days) of the start date of the tour.

All refunds will be processed within 30 days of notification of cancellation.

Memorial (Yahrzeit) Candles

The Memorial (Yahrzeit) Candles / Auschwitz Retreat Scholarship Fund

During the Auschwitz Retreat, there will be many opportunities to light Memorial (Yahrzeit) Candles and say Kaddish (the Jewish prayer for the dead).

We will create one special service as an offering during which Zen Peacemakers participating in the Auschwitz Retreat will light Memorial (Yahrzeit) Candles on the grounds of Auschwitz and read names of your loved ones aloud.

Donations collected for The Memorial (Yahrzeit) Candles will flow directly into an Auschwitz Retreat Scholarship Fund.

Suggested donation is $18 
or $108 
per candle.

Please be sure to include names to be read during this important ceremony. You may want a candle for someone whose name you don’t know. Please simply write, “Name Unknown” and this will be read out loud.

During the retreat, there will be memorial candles available for all retreatants whether you make a donation or not.

Krakow Lodging Information

Hotel prices below are subject to change! Please, check before reserving.

SASKI

Final registration will take place in the Hotel Lobby Sunday night, November 1, between 5:30pm (17:30h) – 7:00pm (19:00h). You will receive your registration packets including bus assignments, lodging information, list of names to read at auschwitz site, name tags and general information.

Most of us will stay at the Saski Hotel which is 1/2 block from Krakow’s wonderful Grand Square – Rynek Glowny. This is a bustling market square with lots of cafes, restaurants, museums, 14th Century Gothic churches, gift shops and fabulous people watching. All the other Krakow lodgings listed are within walking distance of the Saski.

We are reserving a block of rooms at a group discount rate for Sunday night at the Saski Hotel. We recommend that you get reservations at this hotel. The hotel cost for this night is not included in the Retreat Fee.

The only way to make a reservation at the Saski Hotel and receive the Peacemaker discount is to email Dorota Gieldon [email protected] Please give your name, the dates you will be at the Saski and say you are with the Peacemakers. You do not have to give your credit card info until you get there.

*** It is NOT possible to receive the Peacemaker Discount if you reserve your room through the Saski web site!

[email protected] www.hotelsaski.com.pl Double room with bathroom: 410 PLN/ 100 Euro, $130 at Nov 9, 2011 exchange rate incl. breakfast – group reduction will be 20 %

POLSKI (Similiar to SASKI, also a good choice.) [email protected] www.podorlem.com.pl fax (48) 12 429 18 10 Single: 335 PLN Double: 475 PLN 3 person: 550 PLN incl. breakfast – group reduction: 15-30%

ASTORIA In Kazimierz, the old Jewish quarter. [email protected] www.astoriahotel.pl fax (12) 432 50 20 Single: 147 PLN Double room: 196 PLN breakfast: group reduction up to 10%

HOTEL KAZIMIERZ In Kazimierz Miodowa 16 (12) 421 66 29 (12) 421 02 30 phone/fax: +48 (012) 421-66-29, 422-28-84 [email protected] [email protected] www.hk.com.pl

WAWEL-TOURIST [email protected] www.wawel-tourist.com.pl fax (48) 12 42 41 333 Single w/bth 260 PLN Double w/bth 380 PLN breakfast, reduction 10%

ROYAL Sw. Gertrudy St. Tel. +48 012 618 40 00 [email protected] www.royal.com.pl Single: 210 PLN Double: 295 PLN included breakfast

GLOBTROTER HOTEL Librowszczyzna 1 31-030 Kraków, Krakow, [email protected] www.hostelworld.com/availability.php/HostelNumber.1796?PHPSESSID=n1le7012qsp3o8k482um56s3qj3ff5qc We have:

  • six rooms that sleep 2 or 3
  • three rooms that sleep sleep 1 or 2
  • three apartments (two bedrooms in open plan layout that sleep 4 or 5.

Total sleeping places 30 to 40. We always give discounts for groups staying two or more nights. We also have a conference/meeting room for up to 30 people.

Best Regards Jack. To view the price list: www.cracow-life.com/globtroter.

DOM TURYSTY Ul. Krowoderska 5 31-141 Krakow, Krakow, Poland www.hostelworld.com/availability.php/HostelNumber.6444?PHPSESSID=n1le7012qsp3o8k482um56s3qj3ff5qc

U Zeweckiego www.zewecki.com

Inexpensive Lodgings:

Seminarium Duchowne Salezjanow (12) 267 67 66 (12) 266 36 11 12-18 zl for night

Klasztor Salwatorianow (12) 269-12-31 with breakfast 62 zl

Seminarium Zmartwychwstancow ul, ks. Pawlikowskiego 1 (12) 266 69 65

Trzy Kafki Al. Slowackiego 29 (12) 632 94 18 cell: 0 605 293 504 [email protected] www.trzykafki.pl 1-2-3 person rooms

Reading List

Many, many books have been published concerning the Holocaust. Those listed below are particularly recommended because they are very powerful personal accounts of bearing witness and/or raise complex moral and spiritual issues. Suggested readings For first time attendees to the Auschwitz Bearing Witness Retreat, we highly recommend that you read at least one of the following books before the retreat. Ka-Tzetnik 135633. Shivitti: A Vision. Gateways/IDHHB (Canada: 1998). (A must read – Bernie Glassman) Levi, Primo. Survival in Auschwitz. Simon & Schuster (New York: 1996). Wiesel, Elie. Night. Bantam Books (New York: 1982). Historical readings Amery, Jean. At the Mind’s Limits: Contemplations by a Survivor on Auschwitz and its Realities. Schocken (New York: 1986). Borowski, Tadeusz. This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen. Penguin Books (New York: 1976) Delbo, Charlotte. Auschwitz and After (includes None of Us Will Return, Useless Knowledge, and The Measure of Our Days). Yale University Press (New Haven: 1995). Eliach, Yaffa. Hassidic Tales of the Holocaust. Vintage Books (New York: 1988) Epstein, Helen. Children of the Holocaust: Conversations with Sons and Daughters of Survivors. Penguin Books (New York: 1979). Hillesum, Etty. An Interrupted Life: The Diaries of Etty Hillesum 1941- 1943. Washington Square Press (New York: 1983). Hoess, Rudolf, Commandant of Auschwitz. Phoenix Press. Ka-Tzetnik 135633. Shivitti: A Vision. Gateways/IDHHB (Canada: 1998). (A must read – Bernie Glassman) Ka-Tzetnik 135633. Kaddish. Algemeiner Associates (New York: 1998) Langer, Lawrence L. Admitting the Holocaust. Oxford Univ. Press (New York: 1995). Langer, Lawrence L. Holocaust Testimonies: The Ruins of Memory. Yale Univ. Press (New Haven: 1991). Lanzmann, Claude. Shoah: An Oral History of the Holocaust. Pantheon (New York: 1985). Levi, Primo. The Drowned and the Saved. Vintage International (New York, 1989) Levi, Primo. Survival in Auschwitz. Simon & Schuster (New York: 1996). Steiner, Jean-Francois. Treblinka. The New American Library (New York 1967). Szpilman, Wladyslaw, The Pianist: the extraordinary story of one man’s Survival in Warsaw 1939-1945, Victor Golancz (London, 1999) Wiesel, Elie. Night. Bantam Books (New York: 1982). Wiesenthal, Simon. The Sunflower. Schocken Books (New York: 1997). Fictional Novels The Book Thief (2005) by Markus Zusak Knopf (A war story from a child’s perspective – her foster family hides a Jew in their basement) Wilkomirski, Binjamin. Fragments. Schocken Books (New York: ’1997). The History of Love (2005) by Nicole Krass Norton Publishers (story of a Polish Holocaust survivor living in NYC and his friendship with a 14 yo girl.) Schlink, Bernhard. The Reader. Vintage Books (New York: 1998). Stones From the River (1994) by Ursula Hegi Simon & Schuster (In a small German town a father and daughter hide Jews)